Tag Archives: the-right

Mike Huckabee Slams Obama on Gay Marriage – Where Are His Christian Convictions? – Video



Mike Huckabee Slams Obama on Gay Marriage – Where Are His Christian Convictions?
4-11-14 – (Fox News) – Mike Huckabee recently defended his position on gay marriage by saying it's not homophobia to be on “the right side of the Bible.” Huc…

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Mike Huckabee Slams Obama on Gay Marriage – Where Are His Christian Convictions? – Video

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Left-wing MEPs fear voter swing to the right: nationalist parties tipped to triumph in EU elections – Video



Left-wing MEPs fear voter swing to the right: nationalist parties tipped to triumph in EU elections
During the first parliamentary session of 2014 the upcoming European election was a particular focus, especially with an ever-growing surge of far-right poli…

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Left-wing MEPs fear voter swing to the right: nationalist parties tipped to triumph in EU elections – Video

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Right-wing politics – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Right wing” redirects here. For the term used in sports, see Winger (sports).

In left-right politics, right-wing describes an outlook or specific position that accepts or supports social hierarchy or social inequality.[1][2][3][4] Social hierarchy and social inequality is viewed by those affiliated with the Right as either inevitable, natural, normal, or desirable,[2] whether it arises through traditional social differences[5] or from competition in market economies.[6][7] It typically accepts or justifies this position on the basis of natural law or tradition.[4][8][9][10][11]

The term “right wing” has been used to refer to a number of different political positions through history. The political terms Right and Left were coined during the French Revolution (178999), and referred to where politicians sat in the French parliament; those who sat to the right of the chair of the parliamentary president were broadly supportive of the institutions of the monarchist Ancien Rgime.[12][13][14][15] The original Right in France was formed as a reaction against the Left, and comprised those politicians supporting hierarchy, tradition, and clericalism.[16] The use of the expression la droite (the right) became prominent in France after the restoration of the monarchy in 1815, when le droit was applied to describe the Ultra-royalists.[17] In English-speaking countries it was not until the 20th century that people applied the terms “right” and “left” to their own politics.[18]

From the 1830s to the 1880s, there was a shift in the Western world of social class structure and the economy, moving away from nobility and aristocracy, and moving towards the bourgeoisie and capitalism.[19] This general economic shift towards capitalism affected centre right movements such as the British Conservative Party that responded by becoming supportive of capitalism.[20]

Although the term ‘right-wing’ originally designated traditional conservatives and reactionaries, it has also been used to describe neo-conservatives, nationalists, racists,[21]Christian democrats, and classical liberals.[15]

The political term right-wing originates from the French Revolution, when liberal deputies from the Third Estate generally sat to the left of the president’s chair, a habit which began in the Estates General of 1789. The nobility, members of the Second Estate, generally sat to the right. In the successive legislative assemblies, monarchists who supported the Ancien Rgime were commonly referred to as rightists, because they sat on the right side. A major figure on the right was Joseph de Maistre, who argued for an authoritarian form of conservatism. Throughout the 19th century, the main line dividing Left and Right in France was between supporters of the Republic and supporters of the Monarchy.[15] On the right, the Legitimists and Ultra-royalists held counter-revolutionary views, while the Orlanists hoped to create a constitutional monarchy under their preferred branch of the royal family, a brief reality after the 1830 July Revolution. The centre-right Gaullists in post-World War II France advocated considerable social spending on education and infrastructure development, as well as extensive economic regulation, but limited the wealth redistribution measures characteristic of social democracy.

In British politics the terms ‘right’ and ‘left’ came into common use for the first time in the late 1930s in debates over the Spanish Civil War.[22]

The Right has gone through five distinct historical stages: (i) the reactionary right, which sought a return to aristocracy and established religion; (ii) the moderate right, who sought limited government and distrusted intellectuals; (iii) the radical right, who favored a romantic and aggressive nationalism; (iv) the extreme right, who proposed anti-immigration policies and implicit racism; and (v) the neo-liberal right, who sought to combine a belief in a market economy and economic deregulation with the traditional Right-wing beliefs in patriotism, litism, and law and order.[23][24]

The meaning of right-wing “varies across societies, historical epochs, and political systems and ideologies.”[25] According to The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics, in liberal democracies the political Right opposes socialism and social democracy. Right-wing parties include conservatives, Christian democrats, classical liberals, nationalists and, on the far Right, racists and fascists.[26]

There has been considerable criticism of the reduction of politics to a simple left-right axis. Friedrich Hayek suggests that it is incorrect to view the political spectrum as a line, with socialists on the left, conservatives on the right, and liberals in the middle. He places each group at the corner of a triangle.[27]

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Right-wing politics – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Left–right politics – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The leftright political spectrum is a system of classifying political positions, ideologies and parties. Left-wing politics and right-wing politics are often presented as opposed, although a particular individual or group may take a left-wing stance on one matter and a right-wing stance on another. In France, where the terms originated, the Left has been called “the party of movement” and the Right “the party of order.”[1][2][3][4] The intermediate stance is called centrism and a person with such a position is a moderate.

There is general consensus that the Left includes progressives, communists, social-liberals, greens, social-democrats, socialists, democratic-socialists, civil-libertarians (as in “social-libertarians”; not to be confused with the right’s “economic-libertarians”), secularists, and anarchists,[5][6][7][8] and that the Right includes conservatives, reactionaries, neoconservatives, capitalists, neoliberals, economic-libertarians (not to be confused with the left’s “civil-libertarians”), social-authoritarians, monarchists, theocrats, nationalists, Nazis (including neo-Nazis) and fascists.[9]

The terms “left” and “right” appeared during the French Revolution of 1789 when members of the National Assembly divided into supporters of the king to the president’s right and supporters of the revolution to his left. One deputy, the Baron de Gauville explained, “We began to recognize each other: those who were loyal to religion and the king took up positions to the right of the chair so as to avoid the shouts, oaths, and indecencies that enjoyed free rein in the opposing camp.” However the Right opposed the seating arrangement because they believed that deputies should support private or general interests but should not form factions or political parties. The contemporary press occasionally used the terms “left” and “right” to refer to the opposing sides.[10]

When the National Assembly was replaced in 1791 by a Legislative Assembly composed of entirely new members, the divisions continued. “Innovators” sat on the left, “moderates” gathered in the centre, while the “conscientious defenders of the constitution” found themselves sitting on the right, where the defenders of the Ancien Rgime had previously gathered. When the succeeding National Convention met in 1792, the seating arrangement continued, but following the coup d’tat of June 2, 1793, and the arrest of the Girondins, the right side of the assembly was deserted, and any remaining members who had sat there moved to the centre. However following the Thermidorian Reaction of 1794 the members of the far left were excluded and the method of seating was abolished. The new constitution included rules for the assembly that would “break up the party groups.”[11]

However following the Restoration in 1814-1815 political clubs were again formed. The majority ultraroyalists chose to sit on the right. The “constitutionals” sat in the centre while independents sat on the left. The terms extreme right and extreme left, as well as centre-right and centre-left, came to be used to describe the nuances of ideology of different sections of the assembly.[12]

The terms “left” and “right” were not used to refer to political ideology but only to seating in the legislature. After 1848, the main opposing camps were the “democratic socialists” and the “reactionaries” who used red and white flags to identify their party affiliation.[13]

With the establishment of the Third Republic in 1871, the terms were adopted by political parties: the Republican Left, the Centre Right, and the Centre Left (1871) and the Extreme Left (1876) and Radical Left (1881). Beginning in the early twentieth century the terms left and right came to be associated with specific political ideologies and were used to describe citizens’ political beliefs, gradually replacing the terms “reds” and “the reaction” or “republicans” and “conservatives”. By 1914 the left half of the legislature was composed of Unified Socialists, Republican Socialists and Socialist Radicals, while the parties that were called “left” now sat on the right side.[14]

There was asymmetry in the use of the terms left and right by the opposing sides. The right mostly denied that the leftright spectrum was meaningful because they saw it as artificial and damaging to unity. The left, however, seeking to change society, promoted the distinction. As Alain observed in 1931, “When people ask me if the division between parties of the right and parties of the left, men of the right and men of the left, still makes sense, the first thing that comes to mind is that the person asking the question is certainly not a man of the left”[15]

The terms left and right came to be applied to British politics during the 1906 general election, which saw the Labour Party emerge as a third force.[16]

The sociologist Robert M. MacIver noted in The Web of Government (1947):

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Left–right politics – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Occupy Democrats – Moving America FORWARD

Current Events In a press briefing the other day, President Obamas Press Secretary Jay Carney acknowledged the problems Economy The myth that is constantly repeated by the right Economy America is the land of opportunity, right? Think again

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Occupy Democrats – Moving America FORWARD

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France Is One Step Closer to Gay Marriage

A spectre of gay marriage equality may slowly be sweeping across Europe. Taking a cue from their English neighbors, the French took one very big step toward legalizing gay marriage on Tuesday. France's National Assembly (the lower house of Parliament) voted 329-to-229 in favor of a bill extending the right to marry and adopt to same-sex couples. The bill now moves to the Senate, where it is …

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France Is One Step Closer to Gay Marriage

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Weird lights and drinks – Video



Weird lights and drinks
Saw some lights. Doesn't look like a plane cuz it would have a blue light on the left wing along with red on the right. And it wouldn't be flashing at night. Oh and we were deciding who's getting the drinksFrom:lowsicaViews:0 0ratingsTime:00:30More inEntertainment

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Weird lights and drinks – Video

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Homosexual Marriage. – Video



Homosexual Marriage.
This is just my take on Gay marriage. Yes I also think straight people should get the right for civil partnerships and no I'm not gay. I'm just saying in case either comes up as a question in the comments. www.guardian.co.ukFrom:JAIGH83Views:0 0ratingsTime:07:33More inPeople Blogs

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Homosexual Marriage. – Video

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This Might Be The Most Beautiful Photo Of A Rainbow Ever

WOW. Source:? dailymail.co.uk From The Daily Mail : The natural wonder was captured by photographer Justin Lee, who was overjoyed to find himself in exactly the right place at the right time.

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This Might Be The Most Beautiful Photo Of A Rainbow Ever

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Girl Sends Nic Cage Headshot Instead Of Resume

Not necessarily the right message you'd want to send to your potential boss, but then again, it is Nic Cage. Hapless Canadian student Vanessa Hodja posted this screenshot on her Tumblr with the caption: I ACCIDENTALLY SENT MY POTENTIAL FUTURE BOSS A PICTURE OF NIC CAGE RATHER THAN MY COVER LETTER+RESUME, WHICH WAS A ZIP FILE TITLED WITH A BUNCH OF NUMBERS LIKE THE JPG I ACCIDENTALLY ATTACHED OH MY GOD Source: buenastardis

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Girl Sends Nic Cage Headshot Instead Of Resume

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