Tag Archives: project

Volokh Conspiracy: Should libertarians try to reclaim the word liberal?

Some libertarians argue that we should try to reclaim the word "liberal." I am sympathetic to their project. But, on balance, we would do better to stick with "libertarian."

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Volokh Conspiracy: Should libertarians try to reclaim the word liberal?

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Chaldean Town housing project may move out of city

A $10 million-plus permanent housing project envisioned for Detroit’s Chaldean Town neighborhood may instead be headed for Madison Heights. The Chaldean Community Foundation has been talking with the Michigan State Housing Development Authority on financial incentives for a project that would bring 100 or more units of permanent housing to the neighborhood along Seven Mile Road between Woodward Avenue and John R Road.

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Chaldean Town housing project may move out of city

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Defending the First Amendment since 1911 | The independent student newspaper of Texas State University

A proposed single-family housing development on the edge of San Marcos is continuing plans after a name change and an addition of acreage. La Cima, formally known as Lazy Oaks, will occupy approximately 2,000 acres off the intersection of Wonder World and Ranch Road 12, according to Bill Ward, one of the developers on the project.

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Defending the First Amendment since 1911 | The independent student newspaper of Texas State University

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World Bank Approves to Launch Sanitation Improvement Projects in Gaza

WASHINGTON, April 15, 2014 Two projects in the Gaza Strip will respond to health and environmental threats and provide long-term solutions to the treatment of sewage and solid waste, according to a statement by the World Bank.

The US$13 million grants by the World Bank are focused on improving sanitation services in the Gaza Strip, a development priority in the densely populated area facing severe public health and water pollution threats.

Several residential areas have been recurrently flooded with raw sewage causing property damage, injuries and deaths. Illegal dumping and burning of waste are common practices across rural and urban areas causing soil, air and water pollution as well as health hazard, said Steen Jorgensen, World Bank Country Director for the West Bank and Gaza.

Palestinians in the Gaza Strip are entitled to live in a healthy and clean environment. Proper management of municipal waste is a priority that the World Bank is supporting to avoid negative health and environmental impacts on the well-being of Gaza citizens, she added.

The US$10 million grant for the Gaza Solid Waste Management Project, approved by the Bank on March 31, 2014, aims to improve the solid waste disposal in the Gaza governorates through the provision of an efficient, socially acceptable and environmentally friendly mechanism. It will promote citizen engagement towards more accountability through awareness campaigns and the use of social media including text messaging and interactive website.

The new landfill facility will be located in the southern part of the Gaza Strip and will serve about half of the population, in the Middle and Southern Governorates. The grant will compliment about US$25 million in financial contributions from the Palestinian Authority, participating municipalities and several donors including the European Union, the French Development Agency, Sweden, Japan and the Islamic Development Bank.

The rapid population growth in the Gaza Strip coupled with the deteriorating municipal financial and technical capacities to manage the generated waste in a sanitary manner have encouraged illegal dumping and burning of waste, said Ibrahim Dajani, World Bank Senior Operations Officer. The project will establish a solid waste management system and strengthen institutional capacity to manage the sector efficiently. It will also promote private sector partnerships and generate jobs for waste pickers and their families.

The US$3 million grant to the North Gaza Wastewater Treatment Project, approved by the Bank on April 10, 2014, is in line with the Banks commitment to provide a sustainable solution to managing wastewater in North Gaza.

Despite the significant challenges associated with a large scale infrastructure project in a conflict affected area, the World Bank is committed to the construction of a modern wastewater treatment plant and the development of a reuse program to irrigate surrounding fields with safely treated effluent.

With this new grant, the World Banks total contribution towards the project amounts to US$29.8 million in addition to US$7.5 million in supplemental co-financing, said the World Bank statement.

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World Bank Approves to Launch Sanitation Improvement Projects in Gaza

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Gentrification Watch: New Rentals May Occupy Almost a Whole Block in the Mission

Thursday, April 10, 2014, by Tracy Elsen 276 new rental apartments in a building occupying three-quarters of a block on Bryant Street may be on their way to the Mission.

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Gentrification Watch: New Rentals May Occupy Almost a Whole Block in the Mission

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Southwest Florida real estate briefs

D.R. Horton opens models in Sorrento D.R.

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Southwest Florida real estate briefs

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La Follette High construction students learn by building a tiny house for the homeless

Instead of building a shed like they usually do, students in Todd Faulhabers introduction to construction class at Madison La Follette High School this semester are going a little farther to learn basic building techniques. They’re also learning about homelessness by building a tiny house for Occupy Madisons OM Build project. Power screw drivers were whirring full speed one morning last week as students framed walls theyll eventually mount on the base they have already completed.

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La Follette High construction students learn by building a tiny house for the homeless

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CIM Group And Denihan Hospitality Group Announce The First West Coast Location Of The James Hotel Brand At CIM's …

West Hollywoods First Ground-Up Hotel in 30 Years to Occupy the Citys Most Coveted Development Site CIM Group and Denihan Hospitality Group announced recently an agreement to bring The James hotel brand to the Los Angeles area, where it will be situated in the heart of the iconic Sunset Strip at the southeast corner of Sunset and La Cienega Boulevards in West Hollywood.

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CIM Group And Denihan Hospitality Group Announce The First West Coast Location Of The James Hotel Brand At CIM's …

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SJP banner removal implicitly backs pro-Israel view

Every year, Columbia Students for Justice in Palestine holds a series of events as part of Israeli Apartheid Week. This year, that included hanging an administration-approved banner from Barnard Hall. It read, Stand for Justice, Stand for Palestine, and included the logo of our groupa silhouette of pre-1948 Palestine.

As soon as this banner was hung, Seffi Kogen GS/JTS 14, the former President of Columbia/Barnard Hillel called for pro-Israel students and their networks to tell the Barnard administration about their discomfort. By the next morning, Barnard had yielded to those who were upset and removed the banner, without warning or consulting SJP, citing the controversy it caused as the reason for removal.

This controversy was generated by the misinterpretation of a map of historic Palestine drawn without internal borders. These are borders by which the State of Israel itself does not abide. Currently, Israels borders are expanding in several places that are ambiguously defined. This can be seen in the continued building of Israeli settlements in the West Bank, and the ongoing construction of the West Bank barrier (otherwise known as the Apartheid Wall) in a manner that deviates from the Green Line determined by the United Nations, incorporating land from the Occupied Territories.

Kogen and others accuse SJP of attempting to erase Israel off of the map. It is important to remember that real erasure requires bulldozers, tanks, white phosphorus, reserve armies, and concrete walls that divide communities. We attend a university that is invested in a myriad of companies, from G4S (a private security company), to Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Caterpillar, that provide Israel with these tools of erasure. It is extremely troubling to see how a rhetorical twist can make it seem as if a cloth banner created by a student group is somehow threatening, while our institutions profit from violent removals of people from their land. These charges regarding erasure from the map leveled at our banner trivialize the experience of actual violence that we may be complicit in, from the suffering of the people of Palestine to global indigenous dispossession and the oppression of communities of color.

Through this misinterpretation of the map we drew, our banner was labeled as anti-Semitic. As a group that is opposed to all forms of racism, we perceive the equating of any criticism of the State of Israel with anti-Semitism as a mischaracterization of what being Jewish means. Doing so silences Jewish people who define themselves as anti-Zionist. Israel does not represent all Jewish people everywhere, and speaking against the policies of the state is not equal to criticizing Israelis, let alone all Jewish people. Indeed, SJP chapters across the country include anti-Zionist Jews, who are often not welcome in Hillel because it abides by national guidelines to normalize a necessary link between Jewish life and support for Israel.

Regardless of their intent, by removing our banner, Barnard administrators gave the appearance of an agreement with these claims that our message is anti-Semitic. We can only assume that the Barnard administration condones the labeling of a call to stand for justice in Palestine as anti-Semitic, a stance that denies our community the possibility of any actual discussion around what constitutes anti-Semitic and racist language.

What Barnards actions signal is that pro-Israel views take precedencesome feelings are valued over others. This fosters an environment that normalizes hateful speech toward our group and other SJPs. Barnards response to the discomfort of some at the cost of rendering others vulnerable is inconsistent with its claim that Barnard cannot be seen to endorse a political position. A similar inconsistency lies in the fact that Barnard President Debora Sparwho is responsible for this decisionhas been on an all expenses paid trip to Israel as part of Project Interchange, which is run by a vehemently pro-Israel organization, the American Jewish Committee.

With the Colleges president going on this kind of trip in order to build bilateral academic cooperation, it is difficult for us to have confidence in institutional neutrality, even though this was Barnards stated goal when curtailing our previously acceptable and free expression. This kind of non-endorsement policy for banners outside Barnard Hall cannot achieve neutrality because it is fundamentally based on a responsea removal that benefits one position.

If our banner is indeed perceived by some as controversial, is Barnard then unfit for controversy? Can the campus community not handle disagreement, however profound? We are heirs to a rich campus history of student mobilization on crucial political issues, including the anti-apartheid movement that pressured Columbia to divest from South Africa. As students, we are taught to be proud of this history. Political work is made through and deeply connected to difference. If we could express only the same opinions or political positions, any kind of change would be impossible. Thus, banning political banners in this space will affect many student groups engaged in vibrant work on sensitive topics.

All students have the right to speak their minds, and to do so in University sanctioned spaces. The fact that Barnard has silenced SJP in this unprecedented way in response to discomfort does not bode well for the future of critical thought on this campus.

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SJP banner removal implicitly backs pro-Israel view

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Palestine eyes $1B West Bank oil reserves

OCCUPIED JERUSALEM: The Palestinian Authority announced plans Tuesday to explore for oil in the West Bank, adding a new element of uncertainty and confusion into troubled U.S.-backed peace efforts.

The Palestinians described the project, which would take place close to a small oil field in Israel, as a key step toward developing the local economy and gaining independence in the West Bank. But Israel, which wields overall control of the area, gave no indication that it has agreed to the plan, and far less ambitious attempts at economic development have repeatedly foundered in large part because of Israeli restrictions.

Mohammad Mustafa, the Palestinian deputy prime minister for economic affairs, said the Palestinians were seeking proposals from international firms to explore and develop oil in the northern West Bank.

He said the project was among a series of initiatives drawn up by Middle East Envoy Tony Blair to help develop the Palestinian economy. The Palestinian people have the right to use their resources, he told AP.

Blair has proposed a multiyear plan for developing the Palestinian economy, an effort that is intended to complement and bolster U.S.-led peace talks. But the former British prime minister has made little headway in carrying out the projects, which focus on eight areas of the economy, including agriculture, construction, tourism and energy.

Progress has been hindered because many of the projects are planned to take place in the 60 percent of the West Bank that was left under full Israeli control under interim peace deals two decades ago. The Palestinians say they cannot establish a viable state without being allowed to develop this area and say Israel routinely stifles attempts to do so.

According to a map released by the Palestinians, the exploration area covers more than 400 square kilometers in a strip of land along the frontier with Israel. Most, if not all, of this land, remains under full Israeli control.

In a statement, Blairs office confirmed that energy was among the eight sectors targeted in his initiative. Reliable energy supply is critical for the expansion and development of all sectors of the Palestinian economy, it said. The statement made no reference to the project announced Tuesday and gave no details on where any West Bank oil projects might take place.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus office had no comment, and Israels Energy Ministry said it was not involved in the plan.

The Palestinian announcement could open up a new area of protracted negotiations with Israel. International bodies, including the World Bank, have urged Israel to lift restrictions on Palestinian development in Israeli-controlled areas of the West Bank.

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Palestine eyes $1B West Bank oil reserves

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