Tag Archives: music

La fanciulla del West review

Grand theatre, Leeds Opera North's La fanciulla forces a rethink by putting the men of the golden west centre stage If we know one thing about Puccini, it is that he saw into the broken hearts of his heroines and wept with them. While their stories speak of frailty and tragedy, their music affirms their ineluctable strength and the operas bear their names: La bohme , Butterfly , Tosca , Manon …

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La fanciulla del West review

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The xx speak out against Croatian anti-gay marriage group

Croatian anti-gay marriage group stole music by The xx to soundtrack advert claiming marriage is 'a living union of a woman and a man' The xx have issued a statement in support of same-sex marriage following the unpermitted use of their music on an anti-gay marriage advert. The Croatian anti-gay marriage pressure group U ime obitelji , which translates as In the Name of the Family, used the …

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The xx speak out against Croatian anti-gay marriage group

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Kid Seuss – Broken (Official Music Video) [Demo Audio] – Video



Kid Seuss – Broken (Official Music Video) [Demo Audio]
Kid Seuss – The A-Team x Small Town x Tighten Up videolarn After detecting a 5th ping potentially from plane's black boxes, search area narrows further. CN…

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Kid Seuss – Broken (Official Music Video) [Demo Audio] – Video

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The plaintive numbers flow

As we walk around the pond in the Gurudwara Bangla Sahib in Delhi during a film shoot for the BBC, the well known Scottish violinist Nicola Benedetti is amazed at the Raagi singing continuously and even more so when told there is music being performed nearly through the day at the Gurudwara. The strains of the Gurbani, the sweet smell of the Kada Prasad and the whiteness of the marble fuse to create a sense of calm in the atmosphere as the sun is beginning to set in the evening. Informed of the various genres of music in India, she asks me about the spiritual connect in Indian music even the classical has such a deep spiritual feel in it, perhaps it does have to do with the fact that much of it is based on improvisation, on how the artist chooses to fill his/her canvas with music. Nicola says she misses that in Western classical, the music she practices. As we discuss the scope for improvisations offered in the cadenzas by the great composers Mozart, Vivaldi, Brahms and so on, it is evident that Nicola too is very attracted to the idea of how evolved North Indian music practice is, in that it allows the artistes to improvise generously around the grammar of the art form. And while she is discussing the details of the structure and performance of classical music in India, at the back of my mind I feel an unease at how symphony orchestras are such matters of national pride, nurtured and supported through State or public-private patronage.

Nicola (herself a prodigy, winner of Best Female Artiste at the 2012 Classical BRIT Awards and an MBE) was here to play with the 65 member BBC-Scottish Symphony Orchestra (BBC-SSO) that toured across India in April with concerts and workshops in various cities. The BBC-SSO was formed in December 1935 and is a key contributor to the BBCs broadcasting and cultural role. The manner in which the BBC has set up this initiative and uses all its media outreaches is so doable, replicable and fascinating. The Symphony, therefore, performs to large and eager audiences and carries out a busy schedule of broadcasts and concerts throughout the year. The performances are planned out in a nearly 360 degree fashion live concerts, radio, television and Internet. In addition, it has established strong links with local communities through its thriving learning and outreach programme. It is also a major partner in Big Noise, Scotlands innovative project for social change through music. The BBC-SSO appears annually at the Edinburgh International Festival, as well as at other major festivals throughout the world. A look at the website suggests an incredibly hectic concert schedule. The concerts in India went to a full house and usually met with standing ovations. Quite something then to have a public broadcaster patronise a classical music ensemble and conservatoire for close to 80 years!

My unease in all of this gets iterated from a feeling of helplessness that is burgeoning in the artiste community across the country. In India we often seem to reach a roadblock with the pet peeve of how globalization has taken over our aesthetic experience. In this milieu, culture and entertainment have coalesced, thus becoming synonymous. That today the arts must entertain and amuse in the manner largely determined by Bollywood, and that they must be part of organised industry is the clear and unambiguous message conveyed by this shift.

While mass media largely television is this ubiquitous creature that has usurped most of our attention span, it is also true that art and culture in the more conventional sense of live performances are gaining a glamour quotient and audience time. Even if the IICs and NCPAs continue to be popular, there is a lot more imagination one sees in programming and venues. Can we then revisit, consolidate and encourage treasure-troves of our culture? Can we stop lamenting about how everything is deteriorating? Perhaps not until we have answered the big question: Whose responsibility is it really to safeguard this cultural canvas? Who will be the patron? Where is our patron? If the nation believes in preserving its rich cultural heritage and is proud of its artistic traditions, why is it so difficult to get patronage for classical and folk music?

Again, when I look at the Symphony, such a large ensemble, it is so evident that nurturing and promoting this music is a considered an investment. The attention to perfection is admirable. Yes, ours is a soloist tradition so the challenges are perhaps a little different, but importantly it is about providing an atmosphere that supports and encourages that single-minded pursuit, so critical to our training. For artistes who, in an ideal world, create art driven by an artistic urge or by that inexplicable creative charge that propels them towards their forms of expression, this shift from being able to immerse in their art form to toeing the line of the market, of saleability, has had a far-reaching impact. Perhaps, the only institution that has come close to providing this environment is the ITCs Sangeet Research Academy. Till not so long ago the public broadcasters like Doordarshan and All India Radio had complete monopoly on presenting music and dance, including other art forms, and so there was a lot of it one could see and listen to. Unfortunately, for TRPs, they now also want to follow the market. Its unfortunate that markets dictate government organisations and public broadcasting channels as to what is cool Indian music or what is culture; take for example the Coke studio, why should it be telecast on DD?

Living in 21st century India has meant growing up with satellite television and glossy magazines, where corporate social responsibility is about promoting Active Lifestyles (that is encouraging young people to take on football). Added to it is a profusion of information through the Net. It is ironic then that very little is left to the imagination, a situation that has happily only helped disinterested audiences regale in their iteration classical music is boring!

The more pertinent point, however, is that you wouldnt want classical music to struggle it out in an increasingly crowded musicscape from a vulnerable position, by talking about just patronage. For it to become inherently stronger, you need more people to listen to it. Not the story of just classical music in India Vishwanathan Anand said something similar about chess as well! A connoisseur had once lamented about artistes succumbing to commercial pressure now if MacDonalds starts sponsoring classical music, artists will be willing to sing Raag hamburger. Its OK if McDonalds sponsors a classical music concert, as long as they dont insist that the likes of MS Dhoni or Katrina Kaif should MC the show or dictate how long (or short) the Bada Khayal should be!

The author is a musician

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The plaintive numbers flow

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In era of globalization, inclusiveness is the key to innovation

Updated: 2014-04-11 04:56 By Jony Lam (HK Edition)

‘Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet,” wrote Rudyard Kipling in 1889. Today, some Hongkongers are also making a similar claim, thinking that Hong Kong is Hong Kong and the mainland is the mainland. They believe things on the mainland, no matter how fantastic they may seem, are in reality either fake, poisonous, unethical, or any combination of these elements.

To Hongkongers, Tencent’s QQ is nothing but a rip-off of ICQ, just as WeChat, Renren and weibos are clones of Whatsapp, Facebook and Twitter. When Dad, Where Are You Going? became a sensation on the mainland, Hongkongers shook their heads, pointing out that the format was licensed from South Korea and there was nothing new about it.

Hong Kong, on the other hand, is an innovative place. Our originality, for example, enables TVB to keep the variety show, Super Trio Series, running eternally. It debuted in 1995. The hosts of the series – the three “Prize Masters”: Eric Tsang Chi-wai, Jerry Lamb Hiu-fung and Chin Kar-lok – are still entertaining the city with the same kind of games. Anyone who has doubts about the implementation of the Basic Law should watch the show. When they see the same attempts to be funny, which have lasted for the last 18 years, they will be convinced our way of life hasn’t changed a bit since the handover.

Watching the Super Trio Series – from the first Movie Buff Championship – to the more recent Super Trio Supreme and Super Trio Game Master, to the latest Super Trio Maximus, one cannot but admire the level of professionalism in local showbiz. It is not uncommon for juvenile roles in the city to be played by actors in their late 20s or 30s. Jerry Lamb and Chin Kar-lok are now in their 40s. Eric Tsang is 51.

Last month, our pop culture was enriched by the release of Bird of Paradise’s debut music video Landing on the Sun. The singing/dancing boy group is a perfect crossover between the local Mong Kok style and K-pop. They are less feminine than their Korean colleagues, but they still wear eye shadow. The dazzling dance moves and signature offbeat rapping in the music video has captured the city’s heart. People discussing the group and its debut on online forums said they could not believe what they were watching, and the images don’t go away.

People are beginning to call this emerging style MK-pop, so as to celebrate its roots in the much-celebrated local grassroots culture of Mong Kok. However, some insist the abbreviation has a different origin, and in fact means the Marvelous Kai (lame).

The other new MK-pop group now being discussed in the city is Faith. It is famous for the members’ distinctively amateurish dance moves, which may well be intentionally executed and painstakingly rehearsed. If the manager is not jailed for exploiting child labor, the group has the potential to become our city’s Super Junior. However, to the dismay of Hongkongers, Faith’s debut Stop Peeping is not sung in our beloved Cantonese. The production house managing the group said the song was in a language called huayu. To untrained ears it sounds very much like Putonghua with a Hong Kong accent.

The phenomenon of MK-pop reminds us that the line between innovation and imitation is thin. Korea’s Samsung is no doubt inspired in part by the US’s Apple, but it does a very good job pushing smart devices to the next level. Faith appropriates K-pop elements to create MK-pop, and sings in huayu. The mainland learns a lot from the rest of the world, but it also adds many fine touches which are truly pioneering.

Rudyard Kipling’s poem quoted at the beginning also has the following lines, which say, “But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth, When two strong men stand face to face, though they come from the ends of the earth!” This can be construed as saying that despite their differences, when two strong men meet, accidents of birth, whether nationality, race, or family, do not matter at all.

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In era of globalization, inclusiveness is the key to innovation

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West Bank Band – W.B.B. (Official Music Video) – Video



West Bank Band – W.B.B. (Official Music Video)
Music video by West Bank Band performing W.B.B. Produced and directed by Marcus Claessen. Music video was shot in Ramallah and the breakdancing parts were pe…

By: Marcus Claessen

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West Bank Band – W.B.B. (Official Music Video) – Video

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Reggae Music Doniki Gaza Strip New March 2014 – Video



Reggae Music Doniki Gaza Strip New March 2014

By: PSSMusics2

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Reggae Music Doniki Gaza Strip New March 2014 – Video

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Israel's Transportation Ministry earmarks $57 million for West Bank roads

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Israel's Transportation Ministry earmarks $57 million for West Bank roads

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Detroit Institute of Music Education, a New Music College, Launches in Downtown Detroit

DETROIT, March 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Detroit Institute of Music Education (DIME), a music education college dedicated to teaching the next generation of modern musicians, has announced its launch in downtown Detroit. DIME's temporary location at 1520 Woodward Avenue, between John R and Witherell, opened today and will serve as its admissions office and performance space

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Detroit Institute of Music Education, a New Music College, Launches in Downtown Detroit

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British music veterans, with funding from local VC firm, to launch Detroit Institute of Music Education

Originally Published: March 16, 2014 12:15 AMModified: March 16, 2014 5:46 AM Nathan Skid / Crain’s Detroit Business Kevin Nixon and Sarah Clayman, pictured, along with Bruce Dickinson, are bringing the Detroit Institute of Music Education to downtown Detroit this fall. Farmington Hills-based Beringea LLC will invest $3 million in a new music college that will open this fall in one of Dan Gilbert’s buildings in downtown Detroit. Detroit’s reputation as a city on the mend hit just the right note with the music educators behind the plan.

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British music veterans, with funding from local VC firm, to launch Detroit Institute of Music Education

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