Tag Archives: japanese

Do unto us, what we did unto Japan

What is abundantly clear is that there is NO IMPARTIALITY, NO TRANSPARENCY, NO FAIR PLAY and NO FAIR HEARING inside the halls of the UNHRC and a UNHRC head that does not say a word against US, UK and NATO crimes or even call for international investigations against them but goes after Sri Lanka showing her bias and vindictive agenda.

What countries like Japan may like to remember is how Sri Lanka defended Japan in 1951 so much to say that Sri Lanka announced that we would NOT REQUEST WAR REPARATIONS after World War because Sri Lanka wanted to allow Japan to rebuild itself.

This was a magnanimous gesture from Sri Lanka to Japan. Japan voted against Sri Lanka in 2012 and abstained in 2013.

In this hour of need it would be nice for countries to view the allegations and seek clarifications against the lies and hyped up media attention.

Tamil militant groups

To Japan that has been involved through the terror period, it is nice that Japan shows leadership.

Sri Lanka defended Japan at the Peace Treaty of San Francisco its Japans turn to reciprocate

On September 8, 1951, 51 nations gathered at the War Memorial Opera House in San Francisco to officially end World War 2 and to formally end Japans position as an imperial power, and to allocate compensation to Allied civilians and former prisoners of war who had suffered Japanese war crimes. Powerful nations objected to Japan being set up as a US military base and coercing Japans to align to the West. Japan, would recall that it was little Sri Lanka that defended Japan before all the nations present and went a step forward by declaring that Sri Lanka would not accept any reparations from Japan as that would affect Japans economy. In Japans darkest hour and when Japan needed a friend, Sri Lanka came forward in 1951 without strings attached. Japan, with its history, ancient culture and Buddhist identity must realize the predicament Sri Lanka is in to come to Sri Lankas defence as Sri Lanka did when Japan needed support.

Sri Lanka was represented by J R Jayewardene as Finance Minister. His speech received resounding applause and was extensively quoted and appreciated. Excerpts from that speech are given below:

It was at the Colombo Conference of Commonwealth Foreign Ministers held in January, 1950, that for the first time the case for a completely independent Japan was proposed and considered. The Colombo Conference considered Japan not as an isolated case, but as part of the region known as South and Southeast Asia, containing a large proportion of the worlds wealth and population, and consisting of countries which have only recently regained their freedom, whose people were still suffering as a result of centuries of neglect. Two ideas emerged from that Conference – one, that of an independent Japan, and the other, the necessity for the economic and social development of the peoples of South and South-east Asia, to ensure which, what is now known as the Colombo Plan was launched. The treaty now before us is the result of those consultations and negotiations. It represents some of the views that my Government had The main idea that animated the Asian countries, Ceylon, India and Pakistan, in their attitude to Japan was that Japan should be free. Should reparations be exacted from Japan? If so, the amount. How is Japan to defend herself until she organizes her own defence?………… We feel that the allied matters I mentioned earlier are not insoluble if Japan is free, that they are insoluble if Japan is not free

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Do unto us, what we did unto Japan

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Hitachi Puts Global Rail CEO in London for Express Market

Hitachi Ltd. (6501) appointed a global rail chief based in London, bringing the Japanese high-speed train manufacturer closer to key European markets

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Hitachi Puts Global Rail CEO in London for Express Market

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MAX KEISER: Sacred Dow Japanese BOND MARKET as new Fukushima [KEISER REPORT E445] – Video



MAX KEISER: Sacred Dow Japanese BOND MARKET as new Fukushima [KEISER REPORT E445]
MAX KEISER: Sacred Dow – Japanese BOND MARKET as new Fukushima [KEISER REPORT E445] In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert behold…

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MAX KEISER: Sacred Dow Japanese BOND MARKET as new Fukushima [KEISER REPORT E445] – Video

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Language the unifier

I know its unpopular with the nationalists, but Ive long argued the importance of not losing English as the countrys principal language. Yes, losing. When my wife went to school in the 50s and 60s, English was the language of tuition and the language at home together with Tagalog.

I have never accepted the argument that you learn best in Tagalog, or Cebuano, or Ilocano, or Pampango because its the native language at home, because if youre taught in English, the language at home for the next generation is English. Equally, to claim it is necessary to establish a sense of nationhood is disputed by the many countries where the native language has been replaced by English, yet pride in nationhood is strong. The history, the culture, define a nation. Yes, the nuances of a local language are important because it best expresses the culture, but we live in a globalized world today where, if we want to succeed, we must make some changes. One of them is language.

I readily accept retention of Filipino as the primary language, but taught equally with English. Young brains readily accept a two-language education. Whether Tagalog should be replaced with a local dialect (or, more correctly, in several instances, a local language) is probably okay if theres the unifying language of English.

It came home to me over the weekend while reading the Economist, the worlds finest and most thought-provoking English-language magazine. The world is changing, is integrating, at a pace never envisioned. Globalization is the word of this century, and we must be part of that highly interconnected, globalized world.

To make my point, let me quote the Economist, as it said it far better than I can. So here it is, with due acknowledgement (Senator Sotto, please note) to the article The English empire (2/15/2014).

The first point is whether the only other real contender should be Chinese. This is what they said: The Acadmie Franaise may be prickly about the advance of English. But there is no real alternative as a global business language. The most plausible contender, Mandarin Chinese, is one of the worlds most difficult to master, and least computer-friendly. The least computer-friendly is what most struck me. In a world that is overwhelmingly computerized today, this is a critical requirement.

The piece started with examples: Yang Yuanquing, Lenovos boss, hardly spoke a word of English until he was about 40: he grew up in rural poverty and read engineering at university. But when Lenovo bought IBMs personal-computer division in 2005 he decided to immerse himself in English: he moved his family to North Carolina, hired a language tutor andthe ultimate sacrificespent hours watching cable-TV news.

Lenovo is one of a growing number of multinationals from the non-Anglophone world that have made English their official language. The fashion began in places with small populations but global ambitions such as Singapore (which retained English as its lingua franca when it left the British empire in 1963), the Nordic countries and Switzerland. The practice spread to the big European countries: numerous German and French multinationals now use English in board meetings and official documents.

Corporate English is now invading more difficult territory such as Japan. Rakuten, a cross between Amazon and eBay, and Fast Retailing, which operates the Uniqlo fashion chain, were among the first to switch. Now they are being joined by old-economy companies such as Honda, a carmaker, and Bridgestone, a tyremaker.

There are some obvious reasons why multinational companies want a lingua franca. Adopting English makes it easier to recruit global stars (including board members), reach global markets, assemble global production teams and integrate foreign acquisitions. There are less obvious reasons, too. Rakutens boss, Hiroshi Mikitani, argues that English promotes free thinking because it is free from the status distinctions which characterise Japanese and other Asian languages.

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Language the unifier

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Dollar and Yen Shine

The biggest move, over the past week, among the major currencies, was the short squeeze that lifted the Japanese yen. Before last week, the yen was already the strongest of the majors against the dollar, rising about 1.0% through January 17. The combination of the drop in US and Japanese equities, and the sharp decline in US bond yields, helped accelerate the short squeeze, which was already helping the yen recover.

The dollar fell to JPY102, its lowest level since early December. Near-term potential extends to JPY101.50 area, which corresponds to a 50% retracement objective of the dollar’s rally from the early November low near JPY97.60. A break of there opens the door to JPY101.00, the 100-day moving average and JPY100.60 another retracement objective. The JPY103.50-75 area marks resistance. Renewed yen weakness would seem to require a move back up in US yields and/or recovery in the equity markets (and both may take place simultaneously).

The Swiss franc was the second worst performer among the majors until last week. It had fallen almost 2% against the US dollar. Last week it was the second strongest of the major currencies, appreciating about 1.75% against the greenback. This seems appears to be largely a function of short-covering and partly in response to greater capital requirement for mortgage lending, which sparked some concern that Swiss banks would repatriate funds from abroad.

The SNB is most assuredly not going to change its currency cap any time soon. This means that a new opportunity may present itself shortly to buy euros against the Swiss franc on a move below CHF1.2200. The dollar held CHF0.8900 before the weekend. A convincing break warns of retest on the two-year low seen in late December near CHF0.8800. Technically, the dollar posted an outside down week against the Swiss franc, trading above the previous week’s high, and then finishing below the previous week’s low. A move back above CHF0.9000-30 would stabilize the technical tone.

For its part, the euro recovered smartly, after spending four sessions below the 100-day moving average, the longest amount of time below it in six months. The euro’s recovery, counter-intuitively, took place at the same time as the largest decline in the US stock market since last August. Often during the crisis, the euro was often positively correlated with the S&P 500. Now it is flirting with going inverted (on 60-day rolling basis, using percentage change). The euro traded on both sides of the previous week’s range, but failed to finish above the previous week’s high.

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Dollar and Yen Shine

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Word play over govt income and our economic future

Updated: 2014-01-27 08:08 By Tim Hamlett (HK Edition)

Every five years or so, it seems, some supposedly high-powered government committee comes out with a blood-curdling prediction about our financial future. Those of us who have been around for a while have heard this song so many times we can join in: aging population globalization competition welfarism unpredictable government income gloom, doom or new taxes.

Having heard it so many times those of us who have been around for several decades have also seen the earlier versions of the prediction turn out to be a load of rubbish. Indeed this is not surprising. Scientists have determined that predictions produced by experts in politics and economics are uniformly worthless. This is not the experts’ fault. They are dealing with very complex systems. Predicting the future of human societies is like predicting the weather. The difference is that weathermen have the sense not to offer predictions of the local weather in 20 years time.

The new thing in the latest burst of fallible prophecy is the suggestion that the government would find it easier to follow the committee’s advice if it told lies about its income. This is the real meaning of the suggestion that income from land sales, premiums etc. should not be regarded as income. It should be treated as a special kind of non-income which does not show up in the accounts. This would allow the government to plead spurious poverty and so resist pressures to spend money on desirable social goods like poverty alleviation.

Now let us get this sorted out. Income from land is not a “windfall”. A windfall is an unexpected one-off dollop of money which could not have been predicted and cannot be expected to occur again. For example, an ancient legend has it that a large trove of government gold was buried somewhere in the grounds of Government House just before the Japanese invasion. By the time the war was over all the people who knew where the treasure had been hidden were dead or disappeared. So it has never been found. Now if the Government House gardening team turns it up tomorrow that will be a windfall: a pleasant surprise, but no sensible Financial Secretary will expect it to happen again next year.

Income from the government’s land monopoly is not a windfall. It is just an income stream with large fluctuations. This is inconvenient, but not uncommon. If you are in the film business you find that most films do not make money. In fact most large-scale films do not even cover their production costs. A film company makes 10 films, of which maybe eight lose money, one breaks even and one makes huge amounts, covering the losses on the others and providing a profit. This does not mean that if you make 10 films a year you can rely on a regular stream of profits. It means that in some years there will be no big hit and the company will lose money. In others there will be two or three and you will be rolling in it. If a couple of years go by without a hit it is common for the shareholders to panic and fire the CEO. This is commonly followed by a burst of hits, all of which were planned and approved while the last leader was still in charge.

Clearly income which varies a great deal is still income. Moreover, income derived from a major monopoly is not going to disappear altogether. It may fluctuate but it will not sink. Quite a lot of the government’s income fluctuates, actually. The important thing, clearly, is to have large enough reserves to be able to continue with essential expenditure at times when the fluctuations are not helpful. As our government has more reserves than it knows what to do with that condition is clearly met, so the sensible thing to do about variable income is to stop worrying about it.

Instead, we are told, this income which is not income should be put in a separate fund to be spent only on infrastructure projects presumably on the basis that spending on infrastructure projects is not really spending. Well fans of infrastructure spending will say that it isn’t spending: It’s investment. This is a label commonly sought by people who wish to encourage a particular kind of government spending, and indeed almost any government expenditure can be dressed up as an investment if you try hard enough. You can also, without trying too hard, label a lot of infrastructure “investment” as a thorough waste of money undertaken as a sort of poverty relief for the construction industry.

This suggests that whatever we think about the financial prospects in 20 years, it would be a good idea to keep the language of discussion simple. Money coming in is income. Money going out is spent. Other formulations are not helpful.

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Word play over govt income and our economic future

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Abe heads to Africa to boost Japan’s profile

The Associated Press Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, center, and his wife Akie wave as they depart for Africa, at Haneda Airport in Tokyo Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. Abe is heading to Africa, keeping up a busy overseas travel schedule designed to boost Japan’s global profile in the face of China’s rise. (AP Photo/Kyodo News) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

By KEN MORITSUGU/Associated Press/January 9, 2014

TOKYO (AP) Japans leader departed for a weeklong African tour Thursday, keeping up a busy travel schedule designed to restore Japans global influence in the face of Chinas rise, as well as help Japanese companies win business overseas.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who will make a short visit to the Mideast state of Oman before heading to the Ivory Coast, Mozambique and Ethiopia, is taking a different approach to foreign policy than his immediate predecessors, visiting a wider range of countries to try to broaden Japans diplomatic reach.

Publicly, Japanese officials deny that Abes travels have anything to do with China. Wherever he goes, Prime Minister Abe is asked if he is there to compete against China, but thats not our intention at all, Hiroshige Seko, a deputy chief cabinet secretary, said in an interview Thursday. As far as the African nations are concerned, they are important regardless of China.

But the unofficial backdrop is Chinas rise, and the relative decline of a once ascendant Japan during two decades of economic stagnation. Abe wants to restore confidence in Japan, both at home and abroad. He often gives speeches and high-profile media interviews when he travels, for example promoting his Abenomics growth policies to bankers in London and New York.

Its partly about outflanking China, but also about gaining more global respect for Japan and renewing ties with natural allies in Southeast Asia, India and the Middle East, said Kent Calder, the director of the Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies at Johns Hopkins University.

A series of revolving-door prime ministers who served brief terms have hurt Japans diplomacy, and Seko said Abe feels responsible because it started with him during an earlier stint as leader in 2006-07. What Prime Minister Abe is trying to do is to regain what Japan has lost over the past few years, he said.

Abe touched down in 25 countries in 2013, his first year in office. He was the first Japanese leader to go to the Philippines since he visited in 2006, and made it a point to hit all 10 Southeast Asian countries. Other stops ranged from major Persian Gulf oil producers to Turkey, Poland and Mongolia.

Abe told reporters before his departure that Africa can be seen as a frontier for Japans diplomacy. Japan is a longtime aid donor to Africa, and it has stepped up its assistance over the past five years. In June, Japan hosted a meeting attended by nearly 40 heads-of-state of African nations, and pledged another $14 billion over the next five years, as well as promises of billions more in private investment.

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Abe heads to Africa to boost Japan’s profile

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Abe heads to Africa to boost Japan’s profile – Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

By KEN MORITSUGU Associated Press

TOKYO (AP) – Japan’s leader departed for a weeklong African tour Thursday, keeping up a busy travel schedule designed to restore Japan’s global influence in the face of China’s rise, as well as help Japanese companies win business overseas.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who will make a short visit to the Mideast state of Oman before heading to the Ivory Coast, Mozambique and Ethiopia, is taking a different approach to foreign policy than his immediate predecessors, visiting a wider range of countries to try to broaden Japan’s diplomatic reach.

Publicly, Japanese officials deny that Abe’s travels have anything to do with China. “Wherever he goes, Prime Minister Abe is asked if he is there to compete against China, but that’s not our intention at all,” Hiroshige Seko, a deputy chief cabinet secretary, said in an interview Thursday. “As far as the African nations are concerned, they are important regardless of China.”

But the unofficial backdrop is China’s rise, and the relative decline of a once ascendant Japan during two decades of economic stagnation. Abe wants to restore confidence in Japan, both at home and abroad. He often gives speeches and high-profile media interviews when he travels, for example promoting his “Abenomics” growth policies to bankers in London and New York.

It’s partly about outflanking China, but also about gaining more global respect for Japan and renewing ties with natural allies in Southeast Asia, India and the Middle East, said Kent Calder, the director of the Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies at Johns Hopkins University.

A series of revolving-door prime ministers who served brief terms have hurt Japan’s diplomacy, and Seko said Abe feels responsible because it started with him during an earlier stint as leader in 2006-07. “What Prime Minister Abe is trying to do is to regain what Japan has lost over the past few years,” he said.

Abe touched down in 25 countries in 2013, his first year in office. He was the first Japanese leader to go to the Philippines since he visited in 2006, and made it a point to hit all 10 Southeast Asian countries. Other stops ranged from major Persian Gulf oil producers to Turkey, Poland and Mongolia.

Abe told reporters before his departure that Africa can be seen as “a frontier for Japan’s diplomacy.” Japan is a longtime aid donor to Africa, and it has stepped up its assistance over the past five years. In June, Japan hosted a meeting attended by nearly 40 heads-of-state of African nations, and pledged another $14 billion over the next five years, as well as promises of billions more in private investment.

Those efforts have been overshadowed by China’s imports of raw materials, massive infrastructure projects and exports of affordable consumer goods that are widely credited with helping lift African economies in the 21st century.

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Abe heads to Africa to boost Japan’s profile – Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

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Hotel Market Attracts Chinese Buyers

Chinese investors think of hotels as trophy assets because there are few opulent hotels in Asia. LOS ANGELES-Hotels have always been attractive to Chinese investors, and this interest shows no signs of stopping, Greg Karns, a partner with Cox Castle Nicholson here, tells GlobeSt.com.

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Hotel Market Attracts Chinese Buyers

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Police Believe Left-Wing Radicals Responsible For Explosions Outside U.S. Military Base In – Video



Police Believe Left-Wing Radicals Responsible For Explosions Outside U.S. Military Base In
November 29, 2013 NHK News . U.S. and Japanese authorities are investigating two small explosions outside an American air base near Tokyo. Please: Like, Share and Subscribe…Thank YOU !!!…

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Police Believe Left-Wing Radicals Responsible For Explosions Outside U.S. Military Base In – Video

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